• Mutsvairo, B., & Sirks, L. (2015). Examining the contribution of social media in reinforcing political participation in Zimbabwe. Journal of African Media Studies,7(3), 329-344.
  • Ademola Kazeem Fayemi, Towards an African Theory of Democracy, Thought and Practice: A Journal of the Philosophical Association of Kenya (PAK) Premier Issue, New Series, Vol.1 No.1, June 2009, pp.101-126
  • Gukurume, S. (2017). #ThisFlag and #ThisGown Cyber Protests in Zimbabwe: Reclaiming Political Space. African Journalism Studies, 38(2), 49-70.
  • Matingwina, S. (2018). Social Media Communicative Action and the Interplay with National Security: The Case of Facebook and Political Participation in Zimbabwe. African Journalism Studies, 39(1), 48-68.
  • Mutsvairo, B., & Wasserman, H. (2016). Digital activism in the social media era : Critical reflections on emerging trends in sub-saharan Africa.
  • Mabweazara, H., Mudhai, O., & Whittaker, J. (2014). Online Journalism in Africa trends, practices and emerging cultures (Routledge advances in internationalizing media studies). New York: Routledge.
  • Paterson, & Paterson, Chris. (2013). Social media and journalism in Africa (Ecquid novi ; vol. 34, no. 1 (2013). (NL-LeOCL)163866074). Abingdon: Taylor & Francis.
  • Ndlela, M. (2010). Alterntive media and the public sphere in Zimbabwe. Sage Publications.
  • Ndlovu, E. (2014). The Role of Diasporic Media in Facilitating Citizen Journalism and Political Awareness in Zimbabwe, PQDT – UK & Ireland.
  • Runhanya, P. (2014). Alternative Media and African Democracy: The Daily News and Opposition Politics in Zimbabwe, 1997-2010, PQDT – UK & Ireland.
  • Ogunyemi, O. (2017). Media, diaspora and conflict. Palgrave Macmillan.
  • Abive T. Megenta, “Can it Tweet its way to Democracy? The Promise of Participatory Media in Africa”, University of Oxford: Reuters Institute for the Study of Journalism (2010) 1-104.

List of literature I have already read for my BA-thesis:

  • Admire Mare, “Tracing and archiving ‘constructed’ data on Facebook pages and groups: reflections on fieldwork among young activists in Zimbabwe and South Africa”, Qualitative Research 17:6 (2017) 645-663
  • Amanda Atwood, “Kubatana in Zimbabwe: mobile phones for advocacy”, in Sms Uprising: Mobile Phone Activism In Africa, ed. Sokari Ekine (Cape Town: Pambazuka Press, 2010), 86-104.
  • Bassey Nsa Ekpe, “Social Media: Towards the Realization of A Global Stance for the African Voice”, Africology: The Journal of Pan African Studies 10:10 (2017) 109-120.
  • Chippo Dendere and Kim Yi Dionne, ‘’Zimbabwe created a new ministry to monitor social media. But most Zimbabweans don’t want government monitoring.’’, in The Washington Post.
  • Cleophas T. Muneri, “Beyond Blind Optimism: The Case of Citizen Journalism in the Struggle for Democracy in Zimbabwe”, in Participatory Politics and Citizen Journalism in a Networked Africa: A Connected Continent, ed. Bruce Mutsvairo (United Kingdom: Palgrave MacMillan, 2016), 171-184
  • Christine Hine, Virtual Ethnography (California: Sage Publications 2000).
  • Dumisani Moyo, “From Rhodesia to Zimbabwe: Change without Change? Broadcasting Policy Reform and Political Control”, Media, Public Discourse and Political Contestation in Zimbabwe, 27 ed. Henning Melber (2004), 12-28.
  • Dumisani Moyo, “The ‘independent’ press and the fight for democracy in Zimbabwe: A critical analysis of the banned Daily News”, Westminster Papers in Communication and Culture, (2005) 109-128.
  • Dumisani Moyo, “The New Media as Monitors of Democracy: Mobile Phones and Zimbabwe’s 2008 Election”, Open Society Initiative for Southern Africa, 1-17.
  • Essam Mansour, “The Role of Social Networking Sites (SNSs) in the January 25th Revolution in Egypt”, Library Review, 61:2 (2012) 128-159
  • Fadi Salem, “The Arab Social Media Report: Social Media and the Internet of Things: Towards Data-Driven Policymaking in the Arab World”, Dubai: MBR School of Government 7 (2017) 1-85.
  • Fadi Salem, Growth of Facebook Users in the Arab Region between June 2010 and January 2017.
  • G. Kanyenze & T. Kondo, Beyond the Enclave: Towards a Pro-Poor and Inclusive Development Strategy for Zimbabwe. (Harare, 2011), 1-534.
  • Georgia Letcher, The ‘Not Yet’ of Society What does analysis of the main public and private newspapers, The Herald and The Daily News, in Zimbabwe indicate about the role of farm workers in official discourse in the period between September 2001 and September 2002?, MA Thesis Leiden University, 1-57.
  • Habibul Haque Khondker, “Role of the New Media in the Arab Spring”, Globalizations 8:5 (2011) 675-679.
  • Hans Klis, “Mohamed Bouazizi, the first martyr of the Arab Spring” in NRC Handelsblad.
  • Ivelin Sardamov, “Civil Society’ and the Limits of Democratic Assistance”, Government and Opposition: An International Journal of Comparative Politics (2005), 379-402.
  • James Sater, “Civil Society in the Maghreb: Lessons from the Arab Spring.”, in: The Handbook of Civil Society in Africa. Nonprofit and Civil Society Studies (An International Multidisciplinary Series) ed. Ebenezer Obadare, (New York: Springer, 2014), 95-107.
  • Jennifer Preston, “Movement Began With Outrage and a Facebook Page That Gave It an Outlet”, in The New York Times.
  • Joanne Garde-Hansen, “My Memories: Personal Digital Fever and Facebook”, in Save as Digital Memories (London: Palgrave MacMillan 2009).
  • José van Dijck, The Culture of Connectivity: A Critical History of Social Media, (London: Oxford University Press 2013).
  • Last Moyo, “Crossing Taboo Lines: Citizen Journalism Ethics in Political Settings”, in Participatory Politics and Citizen Journalism in a Networked Africa: A Connected Continent, ed. Bruce Mutsvairo, 34-58.
  • Leesa Costello, Marie-Louise McDermott and Ruth Wallace, “Netnography: Range of Practices, Misperceptions, and Missed Opportunities”, International Journal of Qualitative Methods 16:1 (2017) 1-12.
  • Levi Obijiofor, “New Technologies as tools of empowerment: African Youth and public sphere participation”, in Popular Media, Democracy and Development in Africa, ed. Herman Wasserman (London & New York: Routledge Taylor & Francis Group, 2011), 207 – 219.
  • Libya: Arrests, Assaults in Advance of Planned Protests Halt Attacks on Peaceful Demonstrators and Free Those Arrested”, in The Human Rights Watch.
  • Linda Herrera & Michael Peters, ‘’The educational and political significance of the new social media: A dialogue with Linda Herrera and Michael A. Peter,’’ E-Learning and Digital Media, 8 (2011), 364-374.
  • Linda Herrera & Peter Mayo, ‘’The Arab Spring, Digital Youth and the Challenges of Education and Work,’’ Holy Land Studies 11.1 (2012), 71-78.
  • L. Rozemeijer, ‘The influence of Social Media on Citizenship in Zimbabwe, 2010-2018’, http://hdl.handle.net/1887/64976
  • Melissa Wall, “Citizen Journalism”, Digital Journalism, 3:6 (2015) 797-813.
  • Michael Baurmann & Reinhard Zintl, “Social and Cultural Preconditions of Democracy: A Framework for Discussion”, ResearchGate (2006), 19-74.
  • Nawaf Abdelhay, “The Arab Uprising 2011: New Media in the Hands of a New Generation in North Africa”, Aslib Proceedings, 64:5 (2012) 529-539.
  • Nick Couldry & José van Dijck, “Researching Social Media as if the Social Mattered”, Social Media & Society (2015), 1-7.
  • Nkosi Martin Ndlela, “Alternative Media and the Public Sphere in Zimbabwe”, in Understanding Community Media, ed. Kevin Howely (California: Thousand Oaks, 2010), 87-95.
  • OpenNet Initiative, “Internet Filtering in the Middle East and North Africa”, 1-10.
  • OpenNet Initiative, “Internet Filtering in Tunisia”,
  • Patrick Chabal, Africa: The Politics of Suffering and Smiling, (Zed Books 2013).
  • Robert W. Gehl, “The archive and the processor: The internal logic of Web 2.0”, New Media and Society 13:8 (2011) 1228-1244.
  • Robert Kozinets, Netnography: Redefined (Los Angeles: Sage 2015).
  • Sabiha Gire, “The Role of Social Media in the Arab Spring”, Pangaea Journal 7 (2014) 1-10.
  • S. Matingwina, ‘Social Media Communicative Action and the Interplay with National Security: The Case of Facebook and Political Participation in Zimbabwe’, African Journalism Studies, 39 (2018), 48-68.
  • Sarah Chiumbu, “Redefining the National Agenda Media and Identity – Challenges of Building a New Zimbabwe”, Media, Public Discourse and Political Contestation in Zimbabwe, 27 (2004), 29-35.
  • Tanya Joosten, Social Media for Educators: Strategies and Best Practices, (San Franciso: John Wiley 2012).
  • Wendy Willems, “Comic Strips and “the Crisis”: Postcolonial Laughter and Coping with Everyday Life in Zimbabwe”, Popular Communication, 9:2 (2011), 126-145.
  • Wendy Willems, ‘’Theorizing Media as/and Civil Society in Africa,’’ in The Handbook of Civil Society in Africa, ed. Ebenizer Obadare (New York: Springer Science and Business Media, 2014), 43-54.
  • Wendy Willems and Winston Mano, “Decolonizing and provincializing audience and internet studies: contextual approaches from African vantage points”, in Everyday media culture in Africa: audiences and users. (London: Routledge 2016.) 1-21.
  • Yiannis Mylonas, “Witnessing absences: social media as archives and public spheres”, Social Identities, 23:3, (2017) 271-288.

 

Student African Studies Masterprogram 2018/2019